You Can’t Go Home Again

J has been living in a continuing care community for three months now and has not been back to the family home where we lived together for 16 years.  We had our regular visit with her Alzheimer’s doctor last week.  I always meet with him separately and inquired when I might bring J back to the house for a visit.  His advice surprised me.

We have been seeing Dr. R for a number of years, and I have grown to trust him despite a certain formality.  I often describe his looks as a cross between Rod Serling and Mr. Rogers.  Maybe it’s his very thin ties and drab cardigans.  He has a soothing voice but can come off as aloof.  Notwithstanding this affect, I am certain of his experience and caring.

When I asked about bringing J home, he responded with a question.  Not surprising. He is a board-certified psychiatrist after all.  “Has she been asking about home?”  “No,” I responded.  “Then I wouldn’t bring there there.”  “What about the High Holidays and Thanksgiving?” I asked.

Then he asked the questions that put everything in focus: “Why would you bring her home?  Who would that be for?”

“But what about Thanksgiving?” I persisted.  “She doesn’t know it’s Thanksgiving,” he replied.  Then after emphasizing that there is no right or wrong answer (again, he is a psychiatrist), he further explained that J is secure and content at the CCRC and likely would be confused and possibly upset if she were brought back to the house and then returned to the CCRC.  Stability, security and predictability are crucially important to her now.

With that interchange, I had to confront that the desire to have J home for dinners and the holidays serves my convenience, my fantasies of family togetherness and my perceptions of the needs of other family members more than it serves her needs as this point.  And there is the overlay that I plan to put the house on the market next spring, so I have visions of the last this and the last that at this address.  It is hard to accept that J already has spent her last hours here.

More loss.  More loss.

Two of my sisters will be traveling long distances to be with us for Thanksgiving.  We haven’t seen one of them for two years.  She will be bringing her new husband, who none of us has met.  We will have to find a new tradition that incorporates J where she can meet us – in the community where she is comfortable.  Sometimes it is hard to remember that it is about her, not me or us.  So I commit to keeping Dr. R’s question close to mind: “Who would that be for?”

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